IMPORTANT NEWS ON FAILSAFE FOR ALL MEMBERS!

Failsafe is your responsibility
The recently updated MAAC Policy and Procedures document emphasizes the importance of setting and testing failsafe on your radio:

“All members should ensure that the fail-safe feature has been properly set and should check for the correct setting periodically. The manufacturer’s recommended procedure should be followed to set and test the fail-safe.”
MPPD # 12 – Operation of R/C Equipment, paragraph 5.

Failsafe is basically about minimizing the risk to people and property if the radio link is lost, whether because the receiver loses signal, the pilot improperly turns off the transmitter, or some other failure occurs. Any considerations of saving the model are very much secondary. A properly set failsafe is needed to protect against both radio failures in the air and mistakes in the pit area (such as turning off the transmitter with the engine still running or the electric motor plugged in).

Consequently, what really matters for the vast majority of models is that in the event of signal loss the engine or electric motor immediately be shut down or reduced to idle.

Bottom line – you must:
· Understand how to set failsafe on your radio system to kill the engine or electric motor in the event of signal loss. In the case of the popular Spektrum radios, the key point is to have the throttle stick in full low when binding or re‑binding the receiver. Other radios use different procedures, so review the instructions.

· Regularly check that failsafe works correctly, especially after you have made any changes to the programming or installation or have re-bound the receiver. To do this, turn off the transmitter, having taken all necessary precautions to restrain the model or render it safe, such as removing the propeller on an electric motor.

You should also make it a practice to turn the transmitter ON FIRST (before the receiver) and turn it OFF LAST (after the model is safely deactivated with engine stopped or main battery disconnected).

Flight instructors should make a special point of explaining failsafe and showing how it should be tested.
Best,
Frank Klenk
Southwest Zone Director
Chair of Chairmen
MAAC 32001L
519-842-8242 home
519-550-7955 cell
www.maac.ca

maac-logo

The Hangar

The Hangar

A communication page for club members. Featuring Our new “Who’s Flying” app; membership list; and more…

Activities

Activities

We hold various activities throughout the year for our members and the general public.

News

News

News and information about the club and the radio controlled hobby.

Gallery

Gallery

Some of our events and some photos of members flying their AC.

Club Info

Club Info

Information about how to join, our meetings, field location etc.

IMPORTANT NEWS ON FAILSAFE FOR ALL MEMBERS!

Failsafe is your responsibility
The recently updated MAAC Policy and Procedures document emphasizes the importance of setting and testing failsafe on your radio:

“All members should ensure that the fail-safe feature has been properly set and should check for the correct setting periodically. The manufacturer’s recommended procedure should be followed to set and test the fail-safe.”
MPPD # 12 – Operation of R/C Equipment, paragraph 5.

Failsafe is basically about minimizing the risk to people and property if the radio link is lost, whether because the receiver loses signal, the pilot improperly turns off the transmitter, or some other failure occurs. Any considerations of saving the model are very much secondary. A properly set failsafe is needed to protect against both radio failures in the air and mistakes in the pit area (such as turning off the transmitter with the engine still running or the electric motor plugged in).

Consequently, what really matters for the vast majority of models is that in the event of signal loss the engine or electric motor immediately be shut down or reduced to idle.

Bottom line – you must:
· Understand how to set failsafe on your radio system to kill the engine or electric motor in the event of signal loss. In the case of the popular Spektrum radios, the key point is to have the throttle stick in full low when binding or re‑binding the receiver. Other radios use different procedures, so review the instructions.

· Regularly check that failsafe works correctly, especially after you have made any changes to the programming or installation or have re-bound the receiver. To do this, turn off the transmitter, having taken all necessary precautions to restrain the model or render it safe, such as removing the propeller on an electric motor.

You should also make it a practice to turn the transmitter ON FIRST (before the receiver) and turn it OFF LAST (after the model is safely deactivated with engine stopped or main battery disconnected).

Flight instructors should make a special point of explaining failsafe and showing how it should be tested.
Best,
Frank Klenk
Southwest Zone Director
Chair of Chairmen
MAAC 32001L
519-842-8242 home
519-550-7955 cell
www.maac.ca

maac-logo

The Hangar

The Hangar

A communication page for club members. Featuring Our new “Who’s Flying” app; membership list; and more…

Activities

Activities

We hold various activities throughout the year for our members and the general public.

News

News

News and information about the club and the radio controlled hobby.

Gallery

Gallery

Some of our events and some photos of members flying their AC.

Club Info

Club Info

Information about how to join, our meetings, field location etc.